Bringing nature indoors to create peace of mind

0

The floor isn’t tiled, the walls and ceiling aren’t plastered or stained – it feels like an invitation into nature, a raw, rustic vibe abounds

April 05, 2022, 11:30 a.m.

Last modification: April 05, 2022, 11:34 a.m.

There is a casual seating area on the floor and a thin L-shaped waterway around it. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

“>

There is a casual seating area on the floor and a thin L-shaped waterway around it. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

Every artist needs a space of their own – a space where they can achieve peace of mind, free from distractions. Where creativity is bound by no restrictions; where the imagination follows no rules.

Abul Basher is a commercial filmmaker, VFX composer and graphic designer by profession. He has worked for a multitude of creative companies throughout his 18 year career. All these years, his creations were for others.

Since his beginnings in the field as a graphic designer, the idea of ​​a personal studio has remained dormant and has only recently materialized.

The odds were never favorable until now. Even in 2012, he attempted to bring the idea to life. This attempt, however, failed as he quickly realized he was not up to the task.

But eventually, Dzable Studio came to life. He himself designed the space where he currently directs and produces commercial films and animations.

We recently visited his new dream project. We spent hours, from all afternoon until late in the evening, discussing the ins and outs of the studio.

The name of the studio is Dzable Studio, which is a short form of “digitally possible”. It can be difficult to analyze and make sense of it when you first hear it. But that is its intended effect.

The floor is covered with gravel, which creates a slight noise when walking on it. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

“>
The floor is covered with gravel, which creates a slight noise when walking on it.  Photo: Saqlain Rizve

The floor is covered with gravel, which creates a slight noise when walking on it. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

The studio is located on the 4th floor of his building in Mirpur. The space is approximately 1200 square feet. It’s not just his workplace per se; it welcomes creative souls to rest or adda in this place too. He wanted to combine his work and his hobbies under one roof.

Sunlight was streaming everywhere when we entered the space in the afternoon. We weren’t expecting much, being informed in advance that the “magic” begins after the evening.

However, we were struck by the simplicity and minimalism, and wondered how artificial light would bring magic to the space.

Lighting and acoustics have a big part to play in the whole ambience.

Upon entering the room, we walked barefoot on gravel. With each step, there was a faint sound and distinct sensation in your foot. The idea has a functional purpose.

“First of all, the sound is soothing. The loose gravel is intentional. When I step on it after a long period of work sitting at the desk, the sound and a massage feeling on your feet relieves me of stress. It’s the fun loose gravel, but most people fix it with plaster,” Basher remarked.

Basher loves the sound of splashing water and when in his workflow state, it soothes him. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

“>
Basher loves the sound of splashing water and when in his workflow state, it soothes him.  Photo: Saqlain Rizve

Basher loves the sound of splashing water and when in his workflow state, it soothes him. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

The inspiration for the design came from wanting to incorporate nature into minimalism. Indeed, it feels like an invitation into nature, a raw and rustic vibe abounds. The floor is untiled, the walls and ceilings are neither plastered nor colored, the only exception being a solid white color on one side of the wall.

There is a casual seating area on the floor and a thin L-shaped waterway around it. This stream separates this space from the other parts of the studio. Basher said he liked the sound of water splashing and being in his workflow state, it soothed him. In addition, the cold touch of the water brings it closer to nature.

A large tree trunk can be found in one corner of the space.

All of these touches are to incorporate nature into this piece as much as possible.

“In a crowded city devoid of much greenery, this is essential for personal mental health.” Basher said. “My roots are in nature. When I started my career, I distanced myself from nature under the pretext of work. Now I return to my roots.”

“If I could, I would have added ice and fire too!” Basher joked.

Construction of the project began in early February this year. And it took only 20 days to create the current interior. Notably, he took no help from outside.

“Everything is done with the help of friends or family members. Even the color of the wall is done by ourselves. The wiring and the placement of the bulbs are also done by us. Every stone is washed and cleaned to hand. We did the plumbing too.”

The whole project is essentially improvised. For example, the stone collection has an interesting origin story.

The walls and ceilings are not plastered or colored, the only exception being a solid white color on one side of the wall. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

“>
The walls and ceilings are not plastered or colored, the only exception being a solid white color on one side of the wall.  Photo: Saqlain Rizve

The walls and ceilings are not plastered or colored, the only exception being a solid white color on one side of the wall. Photo: Saqlain Rizve

“One day I went for a walk,” Basher explained, “and saw a big pile of stones at a construction site near Mirpur Beribadh area. brain. I bought 2 tons of stone from there.”

Obtaining the trunk and branches, he said: “It’s just from one tree. I knew a friend of mine had a dead tree in his house. I brought it in a van after the having divided into pieces of different shapes.”

The whole process of getting the tree cost him 200 Tk – he paid the amount to the driver of the van. And this information gives us an overview of the project budget and expenses.

Initially, there was a lot of research. However, Basher had one thing in mind: expenses had to be kept as low as possible. “To be honest, we had thought a lot. But whatever we thought and calculated the cost, we saw that it would exhaust our funds. Regarding the budget, my first condition was that we could not overspend. So, I had to get creative.”

When Basher brought stones, tree trunks and branches, his father thought it was crazy. His father scared him, but he repeatedly mentioned his “twin friend” Alvi Chowdhury, who gave him the courage to stick to the plan.

According to Basher, the overall cost is less than 150,000 Tk. The expense is low due to the absence of plaster, tiling or false ceilings.

The place caters to all of Basher’s specific tastes and tastes. “Heaven is everywhere. All you have to do is create it. It’s my personal paradise, and the studio is my personal canvas where I have complete artistic freedom.”

But it’s not just a workplace. Upon entering the space, you will find a rocking chair on the right, while a tent and a swing are on the left side of the room. Not the rigid, sterile workplaces that are the overwhelming norm.

According to Basher, the project is still incomplete. 30% of the work remains to be done. But he also added that it was an ongoing experiment. So things are open to change. One of his next plans is to make an indoor water fountain next to the tent and the swing. And there he wants to step on the water fountain.

Share.

Comments are closed.