The CEO at the factory “a little sore” after his first day

0
Sealord CEO Doug Paulin with staff at the fresh fish factory, which has been hit by severe staff shortages.  Paulin plans to help out until the end of the hoki season.

Provided

Sealord CEO Doug Paulin with staff at the fresh fish factory, which has been hit by severe staff shortages. Paulin plans to help out until the end of the hoki season.

The day after his first shift in the fresh fish factory, Sealord CEO Doug Paulin feels it.

Working on the conveyor belt on Mondays, Paulin would reach and line up the fillets to peel them.

“It’s pretty fast and furious,” he said.

Paulin admitted that it was probably “a little more difficult” than he thought it would be, even though he is in good shape.

READ MORE:
* The boss of a fishing company will work at the factory amid labor shortages
* Sealord spends up to $750,000 on Covid-19 testing
* Sealord offers school hours for the hoki season

“You’re doing different moves than you normally do…I’m actually in a bit of pain today, to be fair.

“You get a new respect for people doing this for 18 weeks in hoki season because the volumes are so high.”

As a rookie, he wasn’t quite able to keep up with the old-timers during the shift.

“The lady working across the street…laughed a little sometimes. I got a little late

“It’s one of those jobs where, if you do it often, you get better and better. His movements were much smaller than my movements.

Paulin with staff outside the fresh fish factory, where he will help out during the hoki season.

Provided

Paulin with staff outside the fresh fish factory, where he will help out during the hoki season.

Paulin said it was nice to see the morale of the team working in the factory, alongside 11 office workers who walked in after the shift ended.

He ended his shift “with pieces of fish all over his arm” because he hadn’t put on blue plastic arm guards.

“The lady next door was laughing and I thought, ‘Yeah, I definitely should have taken them’. Lesson learned.”

Fortunately, however, there was no smell left behind.

“You don’t smell like fish at all, because all the fish is fresh.”

Paulin said he plans to be “in and out of the factory until the end of the hoki season” around mid-September.

BRADEN FASTER/STUFF

The crew of the fishing vessel Sealord Otakou at sea in Cook Strait at the end of the hoki season. (First published October 2020).

Share.

Comments are closed.